Text 29 Jul Portable Hard Drive Seagate 1TB USB 3.0 - Benchmarks

External HDD on USB2.0 Port On Board
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CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3 x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo
Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/
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* MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

Sequential Read : 29.859 MB/s
Sequential Write : 13.704 MB/s
Random Read 512KB : 20.027 MB/s
Random Write 512KB : 13.664 MB/s
Random Read 4KB (QD=1) : 0.441 MB/s [ 107.7 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=1) : 0.959 MB/s [ 234.0 IOPS]
Random Read 4KB (QD=32) : 0.516 MB/s [ 125.9 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=32) : 1.024 MB/s [ 249.9 IOPS]

Test : 500 MB [D: 5.0% (93.8/1863.0 GB)] (x1)
Date : 2014/07/29 13:07:31
OS : Windows 7 Professional SP1 [6.1 Build 7601] (x64)


External HDD on USB3.0 on Expresscard

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CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3 x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo
Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/
———————————————————————————————————-
* MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

Sequential Read : 67.676 MB/s
Sequential Write : 116.353 MB/s
Random Read 512KB : 31.494 MB/s
Random Write 512KB : 57.829 MB/s
Random Read 4KB (QD=1) : 0.467 MB/s [ 114.0 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=1) : 1.052 MB/s [ 256.7 IOPS]
Random Read 4KB (QD=32) : 0.534 MB/s [ 130.3 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=32) : 1.035 MB/s [ 252.6 IOPS]

Test : 500 MB [D: 5.0% (93.8/1863.0 GB)] (x1)
Date : 2014/07/29 13:10:18
OS : Windows 7 Professional SP1 [6.1 Build 7601] (x64)

Text 29 Jul SD Card Benchmark - On Board, USB 2.0, USB 3.0 and Expresscard

ON BOARD SD CARD READER

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CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3 x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo
Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/
———————————————————————————————————-
* MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

Sequential Read : 16.358 MB/s
Sequential Write : 11.909 MB/s
Random Read 512KB : 16.415 MB/s
Random Write 512KB : 10.304 MB/s
Random Read 4KB (QD=1) : 2.969 MB/s [ 724.9 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=1) : 1.947 MB/s [ 475.3 IOPS]
Random Read 4KB (QD=32) : 3.494 MB/s [ 853.1 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=32) : 1.897 MB/s [ 463.1 IOPS]

Test : 50 MB [E: 1.2% (0.4/29.7 GB)] (x1)
Date : 2014/07/29 12:51:07
OS : Windows 7 Professional SP1 [6.1 Build 7601] (x64)

TRANSCEND USB READER on USB2.0 PORT

———————————————————————————————————-
CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3 x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo
Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/
———————————————————————————————————-
* MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

Sequential Read : 31.023 MB/s
Sequential Write : 18.725 MB/s
Random Read 512KB : 30.257 MB/s
Random Write 512KB : 14.064 MB/s
Random Read 4KB (QD=1) : 4.377 MB/s [ 1068.6 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=1) : 2.087 MB/s [ 509.6 IOPS]
Random Read 4KB (QD=32) : 6.219 MB/s [ 1518.3 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=32) : 2.320 MB/s [ 566.5 IOPS]

Test : 50 MB [D: 1.2% (0.4/29.7 GB)] (x1)
Date : 2014/07/29 12:54:05
OS : Windows 7 Professional SP1 [6.1 Build 7601] (x64)

TRANSCEND USB READER on USB3.0 PORT via EXPRESSCARD

———————————————————————————————————-
CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3 x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo
Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/
———————————————————————————————————-
* MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

Sequential Read : 75.053 MB/s
Sequential Write : 76.913 MB/s
Random Read 512KB : 69.213 MB/s
Random Write 512KB : 34.385 MB/s
Random Read 4KB (QD=1) : 6.707 MB/s [ 1637.5 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=1) : 2.248 MB/s [ 548.9 IOPS]
Random Read 4KB (QD=32) : 7.376 MB/s [ 1800.7 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=32) : 2.418 MB/s [ 590.4 IOPS]

Test : 50 MB [D: 1.2% (0.4/29.7 GB)] (x1)
Date : 2014/07/29 12:56:35
OS : Windows 7 Professional SP1 [6.1 Build 7601] (x64)

SANDISK SD CARD READER via EXPRESSCARD

———————————————————————————————————-
CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3 x64 (C) 2007-2013 hiyohiyo
Crystal Dew World : http://crystalmark.info/
———————————————————————————————————-
* MB/s = 1,000,000 byte/s [SATA/300 = 300,000,000 byte/s]

Sequential Read : 19.578 MB/s
Sequential Write : 18.019 MB/s
Random Read 512KB : 16.686 MB/s
Random Write 512KB : 13.545 MB/s
Random Read 4KB (QD=1) : 5.007 MB/s [ 1222.4 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=1) : 2.471 MB/s [ 603.4 IOPS]
Random Read 4KB (QD=32) : 5.439 MB/s [ 1327.9 IOPS]
Random Write 4KB (QD=32) : 2.657 MB/s [ 648.6 IOPS]

Test : 50 MB [D: 1.2% (0.4/29.7 GB)] (x1)
Date : 2014/07/29 12:59:33
OS : Windows 7 Professional SP1 [6.1 Build 7601] (x64)

Photo 11 Jul 10 Years ago when I was a junior Linux tech i would have never thought Linux would be able to support the RDP Protocol as a Server.

10 Years ago when I was a junior Linux tech i would have never thought Linux would be able to support the RDP Protocol as a Server.

Link 11 May Reasonable DRM»

While on my flight back from visiting family in Mexico. I decided to research desktop software licensing packages that I’d like to use in my next upcoming software.

Recently I was burned by heavy handed DRM, I was looking for something reasonable.  I think I found it, LimeLM.  One of the features of LimeLM is hardware matched licensing mechanisms, and that the hardware simply can be “fuzzy-matched” if the user changes their hardware.  Like add SSDs, replace video cards, etc,.

Most of the software I will be writing has to work with the desktop; because I will be interfacing with hardware (scales, scanners, etc,.).  I particularly like that space, and having reasonable DRM for my licensing scheme will help keep customers happy, and let me sleep at night.

Text 27 Apr Scale Keyboard - Get Scale Data like a Keyboard

Scale Keyboard is my little weekend project to treat a Dymo M10 scale like a keyboard.  The inspiration came from a client asking if Fishbowl Inventory was “Scale enabled.” I said, it wasnt, but that doesnt mean we cant find a solution. Further inspiration came from USB Barcode scanners that act like keyboards when a Barcode is scanned, the data is sent as key presses into wherever the computer cursor is located. 

Example

Earlier this week I bought the Dymo M10 Digital Postal Scale from Amazon, and it arrived Friday. This Sunday I spent the better part of the afternoon researching the device, USB Protocols, and the best way to simulate what a USB Barcode scanner worked.

One issue that I found was that there is no “Trigger” for a scale like there is for a Barcode Scanner, so I’d have to find my own.

A second issue was that there was no documentation on most of these devices, and if there is; I’d have to pay for it, so I’d have to reverse engineer how to talk to it.

Then there was the issue of actually making this work within Windows, and without too much fuss.

After about 6 hours in Visual Studio, I came up with this.

In the GIF above, Left; I have a window noting what the Application is doing, and Right; I have Fishbowl Inventory with a possible use case.  

The client wanted to see if they could use a scale to get the weight of materials being sold.  So in this example all they would need to do is place the cursor where the Quantity field would be; hit a hotkey (F9 in this example), and the weight would be “keyed-in” from the device.

There is some more work to be done to enable preferences, and additional support for other scales and different connectivity (USB, Serial, Ethernet, Bluetooth).

But this is a great starting point for me, as a technical exercise, and possible solution for clients.

There does exist a commercial product called WinWedge.  It costs approximately $259 Standard or $495 Professional. http://www.taltech.com/winwedge

I can see why, it supports a variety of devices, and seems to have years of development.  So this would not at all be competitive to that, but is good to know that such a solution does exist.

-Israel

Link 23 Apr View Raw Data from Windows Clipboard»

Recently I’ve been troubleshooting a situation where data from a user’s Excel file is being parsed incorrectly in an application I wrote.  I used this nifty tool to view the raw data and format before the application consumed it.

Unfortunately for me, the data was clean, pointing towards the application as the source of the problem; but 5 years ago I wish I knew this existed.

Video 12 Apr

Varnish developer Poul-Henning Kamp describes the possible astroturfing of OpenSSL back in February of this year. Scary stuff.

Video 10 Mar

This is the game performance app I have been developing over the weekend.   Its primary focus is Planetside 2, but it should work for any other game as well.

Photo 4 Mar What I get when I have to open up my WHOIS information to get a code signing cert. Sigh. I obviously can’t prove this case, but I did just open up the domain privacy settings yesterday, and listed my number on white pages for Comodo to verify. :(

What I get when I have to open up my WHOIS information to get a code signing cert. Sigh. I obviously can’t prove this case, but I did just open up the domain privacy settings yesterday, and listed my number on white pages for Comodo to verify. :(

Text 1 Mar Getting my own Code Signing Certificate

Today I signed up for a five year code signing certificate.  Kind of a step up as a software developer to put in the trust level for software to say “Israel Lopez” wrote/built this code.


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